Friday, February 7, 2020

Article review one Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Review one - Article Example In teaching business ethics, it is not necessary that the virtues are built from scratch but already developing students can be helped into becoming ethical business people. The article is informative in personal development and showcases the tactics used by business schools into grooming young people in developing the skills to excel in the corporate world. The article discussed the Aristotelian point of view of personal development and how the upbringing in a particular environment is responsible for the building of character and virtues. The type of upbringing and the scenarios that are faced by an individual during early life make a larger impact and direct the behavior of individuals accordingly. For example, if successful people are asked to change something about their life they tend to say that, they would rather spend more time with their families than on their business. The article further depicts how human behavior constantly keeps on changing with time and age. Perspective widens and a more open approach towards issues leads to better decision making or alteration. The incorporation of business example with everyday scenario makes the article gripping and coherent in conveying the view of point that how personal development can happen on any scale. This can apply to business as well where business students are given case stu dies that help them broaden their perspective and achieve goals. The article discusses character building and reshaping of virtues in business schools. The main point is how from an Aristotelian point of view, people develop their morals and virtues. Business ethics are far more different with respect to the fact that every client is different and needs to be dealt with in a different manner. There is a question of personal goals and then the ways through which it can be achieved. The

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Compare and contrast of the three women Essay Example for Free

Compare and contrast of the three women Essay Virgin Mary Mary is an important figure in catholic faith, Mother of Jesus Christ in physical body, she is also the spiritual Mother of the Church, the Bishops of the Second Vatican Council gave this title to her. We know little biographical information about Mary, our greatest source would be the books of Matthew, Mark, John and Luke. From these spiritual accounts and knowledge of the everyday circumstances she would have faced comes a picture of the Mary the shepherds would have found in Bethlehem: a woman who was young, devout, offended by injustice, devoted to her child, and, many believe, sorrowful in the knowledge of what his fate would be. Mary was bethroed to Joseph when the angel Gabriel appears to her and says she is to bear the son of God, she asks, How can this be, since I am a virgin? She is told that nothing is impossible with God. Marys consent and willingness to endure social injustice for God is an holy act in itself, as women suspected of adultery were often stoned to death. Throughout her life she seen as very holy and is believed to be the Immaculate Conception i.e. born without any sin. Although Mary herself is holy as well as all her acts, the most courageous act she did was watching her son die on the cross. Mary endured the pain because she was a good piteous woman devoted to God, she knew Jesus death was inevitable. Florence Nightingale Florence Nightingale was born in May 12th 1820. She was an aristocrat born to wealthy British parents. At 16 Florence thought she heard the voice of God telling her that she had a special mission in life. Florence suspected it had something to do with nursing because as a young child she had always enjoyed caring for the sick. Traditionally she was meant to behave like a upper class lady, but Florence was reculant to do so, having found her passions elsewhere. She turned down suitors and social parties to instead take up studying health and medicine. As she was a woman of the upper class, this behaviour was not expected. A cultured lady of that day did not enter in hospital work and her familys opposition finally prevented her from  working in a hospital. She overcame this obstacle by studying at a protestant school for nursing. Later she became the superintendent of a hospital in London. At the Crimean War, Florence was asked to take charge of nursing. There she revolutionized hospital care. She cleaned up the hospital, set schedules, ordered supplies, and once the hospital was running smoothly- taught the soldiers how to read and write. When she returned to England she fell sick from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Ministers, heads of government, authors, politicians and reformers came to her for her advice. She received many public honors and was the first woman to be awarded the British Order of Merit. Florence almost single-handedly invented modern nursing, as we know it today, and created a new image of female nurses as a professional class. Irena Sendler Irena Sendler was born in 1910 in Otwock, a town some 15 miles southeast of Warsaw. She was greatly influenced by her father who was one of the first Polish Socialists. During WW11 Irene defied the Nazis and in a show of remarkable bravery, rescued 2,500 Jewish children by smuggling them out of the Warsaw Ghetto. She was rescuing these children from most certain death, as very few came out of the Warsaw Ghetto alive. Irene worked in the Warsaw Social Welfare Department and as a result was able to go about freely without suspicion. When Irene saw the prejudice and terrible conditions that were being forced upon the Jews she was appalled and decided to join the Polish underground resistance movement Aid to the Jews. Irena Sendler accomplished her incredible deeds with the active assistance of the church. I sent most of the children to religious establishments, she recalled. I knew I could count on the Sisters. The children were given false identities and placed in homes, orphanages and convents. Irena Sendler carefully noted, in coded form, the childrens original names and their new identities. But the Nazis became aware of Irenas activities, and on October 20, 1943 she was arrested, imprisoned and tortured by the Gestapo, who broke her feet and legs. Though she was the only one who knew the names and addresses of the families sheltering the  Jewish children, she withstood the torture, refusing to betray either her associates or any of the Jewish children in hiding. She escaped from prison but for the rest of the war the Gestapo pursued her. After the war she dug up the jars and used the notes to track down the 2,500 children she placed with adoptive families and to reunite them with relatives scattered across Europe. This lovely, courageous woman was one of the most dedicated and active workers in aiding Jews during the Nazi occupation of Poland. Her courage enabled not only the survival of 2,500 Jewish children but also of the generations of their descendants. Her courage, strength and the goodness of her spirit is honored forever by those lives she saved. Compare and Contrast Mary, Irena Sendler, and Florence Nightingale all have something in common. Each and every one overcame social injustice, discrimination and prejudice in the name of all things good. Virgin Mary knew she would be shunned, as her baby was conceived before marriage, back then adultery was punishable by stoning to death, yet she agreed to do gods work out of love for the Lord. Irena Sendler risked her life for the 2,500 children she saved, her deeds could have gotten her killed yet her faith and morality was more important to her, and Florence Nightingale overcame the social ethics and restrictions of her time to do what she believed to be Gods work. Another similarity is the fact that all three women saved lives in their own respective way. Unlike Florence and Irena, Mary did her deeds indirectly and in a more spiritual sense, she gave birth to Jesus who is spiritually viewed as the savior of mankind, he gave people salvation, faith and hope. Also, today many people see Mary as a role model and through her seek inspiration that leads many people to give up sin and live a good and holy life. This contrasts to the work of Florence Nightingale and Irena Sendler, these two woman saved people in the physical sense, through knowledge, nursing, and trying to prevent genocide. These woman strike inspiration and strength in all that read their story. Though they come from different eras and have different life stories to tell, all three are fine examples of the strength, faith and capabilities of a woman. Bibliography Internet http://net2.netacc.net/~mafg/mary03.htm http://www.auschwitz.dk/Sendler.htm http://www.catholic.org/saints/saints/lucy.html http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/stl01001.htm http://www.dnai.com/~borneo/nightingale/tl1.htm http://www.geocities.com/squillin_us/Mother%20Mary.htm http://www.holocaustforgotten.com/sendler.htm Books Book of Saints Mark Straton 1991 J.M Dent Pty. Dictionary of World Biography. Barry Jones 1998 The Age Encyclopedia of World Biography McGraw Hill 1973 McGraw Hill Inc. Florence Nightingale John Drasedon 1988 Wiley and Sons LTD Virgin Mary Linda McWell 1963 Curtin Pty.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Freedom and Servitude in Shakespeares The Tempest Essay -- The Tempes

Freedom and Servitude in Shakespeare's The Tempest What is slavery? Is it an institution? A mental state? A physical state? Is it human nature? Or is, â€Å"†¦slavery is†¦an inherent, natural and eternal inheritance of a large portion of the human race† (Ruskin 307). Whether or not any one of these options is true, the fact remains that each says something about humanity. Therefore, when a play like The Tempest comes along, centering on the themes of freedom and servitude, one must look for the commentary that is thereby produced, keeping in mind that Shakespeare rarely lacked commentary. Of course, in Shakespeare’s way, there are several characters introduced within this theme. Hence, I pose the question: Who is the slave? Granted, all may embody different aspects of slavery, making â€Å"each character† the answer; but individually, each character still gives its own consideration to the topic. Following are the different possibilities of characters posing as the slave, leading to a discu ssion of freedom and servitude that is implied as a result. I will be relating the climate of slavery depicted in the play with other cultures, purely to give a frame of reference based on the general knowledge we have, given society’s history of slavery. ARIEL (since the character is gender non-specific, I will refer to him/her as â€Å"it† or â€Å"the spirit†) One of the spirits that Prospero has control over, Ariel, would be an assumed representative of servitude. The spirit’s role throughout the play is centered on the obeying of the orders that Prospero puts forth to be carried out. Ariel does have an apparent loyalty and respect for Prospero, though, which makes it easy for him to manipulate the spirit. He was, of course, the... ...n.htm. Gervinus, G.G. "The Tempest." The Shakespeare Criticism Volume 8. Gale Research Inc., Detroit. 1989: 304-307. Greenblatt, Stephen. Introduction to the Tempest. The Norton Shakespeare. New York: W.W. Norton and Co. 1997: 3047-3053 James, D.G. (Excerpt from a series of lectures delivered in 1965 at University College, London.) The Shakespeare Criticism Volume 8. Gale Research Inc., Detroit. 1989: 429-434. Knight, G. Wilson. "The Crown of Life." The Shakespeare Criticism Volume 8. Gale Research Inc. Detroit. 1989: 364. Ruskin, John. The Shakespeare Criticism Volume 8. Gale Research Inc., Detroit. 1989: 307. Shakespeare, William. "The Tempest." The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. New York: W.W. Norton and Co., 1997: 3055-3106. Takaki, Ronald. A Different Mirror. Little Brown and Company, Boston. 1993: 191. Freedom and Servitude in Shakespeare's The Tempest Essay -- The Tempes Freedom and Servitude in Shakespeare's The Tempest What is slavery? Is it an institution? A mental state? A physical state? Is it human nature? Or is, â€Å"†¦slavery is†¦an inherent, natural and eternal inheritance of a large portion of the human race† (Ruskin 307). Whether or not any one of these options is true, the fact remains that each says something about humanity. Therefore, when a play like The Tempest comes along, centering on the themes of freedom and servitude, one must look for the commentary that is thereby produced, keeping in mind that Shakespeare rarely lacked commentary. Of course, in Shakespeare’s way, there are several characters introduced within this theme. Hence, I pose the question: Who is the slave? Granted, all may embody different aspects of slavery, making â€Å"each character† the answer; but individually, each character still gives its own consideration to the topic. Following are the different possibilities of characters posing as the slave, leading to a discu ssion of freedom and servitude that is implied as a result. I will be relating the climate of slavery depicted in the play with other cultures, purely to give a frame of reference based on the general knowledge we have, given society’s history of slavery. ARIEL (since the character is gender non-specific, I will refer to him/her as â€Å"it† or â€Å"the spirit†) One of the spirits that Prospero has control over, Ariel, would be an assumed representative of servitude. The spirit’s role throughout the play is centered on the obeying of the orders that Prospero puts forth to be carried out. Ariel does have an apparent loyalty and respect for Prospero, though, which makes it easy for him to manipulate the spirit. He was, of course, the... ...n.htm. Gervinus, G.G. "The Tempest." The Shakespeare Criticism Volume 8. Gale Research Inc., Detroit. 1989: 304-307. Greenblatt, Stephen. Introduction to the Tempest. The Norton Shakespeare. New York: W.W. Norton and Co. 1997: 3047-3053 James, D.G. (Excerpt from a series of lectures delivered in 1965 at University College, London.) The Shakespeare Criticism Volume 8. Gale Research Inc., Detroit. 1989: 429-434. Knight, G. Wilson. "The Crown of Life." The Shakespeare Criticism Volume 8. Gale Research Inc. Detroit. 1989: 364. Ruskin, John. The Shakespeare Criticism Volume 8. Gale Research Inc., Detroit. 1989: 307. Shakespeare, William. "The Tempest." The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. New York: W.W. Norton and Co., 1997: 3055-3106. Takaki, Ronald. A Different Mirror. Little Brown and Company, Boston. 1993: 191.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Causes of Corruption Essay

Many officials are motivated to participate in corrupt behavior because of the inherently selfish desire to have an unfair advantage over their peers. Through bribery, extortion, embezzlement, nepotism and other means, corruption can help dishonest people get ahead while the public pays the price. A corrupted politician may seek to sway a person’s opinions, actions, or decisions, reduce fees collected, speed up government grants, or change outcomes of legal processes. Through corruption, people seeking an unfair advantage may pay courts to vote in their favor or, as with police, customs units, and tax collectors, to disregard a penalty. Bribery may be paid to allow for otherwise unacceptable building and zoning permits, to sway school exam results or allow acceptance by an unqualified student into a school system. People in the private sector may pay off politicians so that they dismiss rules and regulations to protect employees in the workforce. Corruption motivated by an   unfair advantage may also occur in immigration, passport and visa offices in which unqualified individuals may be allowed an unfair advantage to obtain these important documents, at the expense of others. In order to obtain an unfair advantage, governments and government officials may apply any number of methods to abuse their power over the citizens. First, a politician may apply diplomatic, political, or financial pressure, for example trade embargoes. However such pressures may also work to effectively bully vulnerable citizens. Also, many countries are the recipients of development aid, which might cause politicians who seek an unfair advantage to earmark this funding towards their particular cause. The threat of reduced foreign aid, defense ties, arm deals, and gifts may help politicians to obtain an unfair advantage through corruption. Lack of Punitive Measures Thomas Hobbes, the great political philosopher, once said, â€Å"A man’s conscience and his judgment is the same thing; and as the judgment, so also the conscience, may be erroneous.† This idea that individuals cannot always rely on a working inner moral compass alone to guide them to virtue is at the heart of the next motivating factor for participating in corrupt behavior. When the legal agencies do not impose sanctions on parliamentarians and other government officials who have violated their public duties there is a lack of punitive measure for corrupt behavior. This is the case, for example when judges are in the pay of the ruling party or there are too few police officers to enforce the law. When there are not punitive measures to assure transparency, monitoring, and accountability through a working justice system, some people will participate in corrupt behavior simply because they can get away with it. Politicians and other individuals require a legal, monitoring system to assure that corruption will not occur in the planning and execution of public sector budgets. Social and internal control mechanisms are required for civil society and autonomous state auditing agencies. Without them or with only weak enforcement measures, people in power are more   likely to embezzle money from the national budget, sway votes or participate in other actions that will result in personal gain at the public’s expense. Lack of Transparency Transparency describes when there is free access by citizens to public information. When the rules, procedures, and objectives of the government are not available to the public, there is not budgetary and administrative oversight to balance the power of government officials, transparency is lacking and corruption can be bred. Without oversight and transparency of budget and rules, national resources may be plundered and power may be abused in favor of the corrupt official only. Further, when there are not public sector mechanisms that channel social preferences and specific complaints of the population to the agencies involved in those complaints, people of power will not serve their purpose of representing the populace, but have free reign to do as they please in the public sector. Lack of transparency creates opportunities for public officials to abuse their office for private gain. This closely relates to accountability, and weak accountability mechanisms tend to facilitate corruption. Where there is a lack of transparency and accountability corruption will flourish. Once corrupt bureaucrats realize that they can take advantage of regulations, they will produce more regulations and run the risk of becoming less transparent. Poor Incentive Structures Bad incentives, such as clerks not earning a living wage or not having job security might also encourage corrupt behavior such as supplementing income with bribes. Some people who do not have an incentive to perform their official duties, but actually pay for their jobs with the understanding that they will make money through bribes. A lack of incentive also results when positions of power are granted as a result of favoritism and nepotism (See unit 1). Making people resist hard work. Incentives also come into the picture when salaries are so low that people cannot meet the basic living standards for food  and housing. As a result, people will often  take other jobs that cause absenteeism of  public officials, and often increase the  demand by government officials for bribes  and other paybacks in order to supply the  public  services. Problems with the law: Lawless and Over Regulated Governments Corruption can also be caused when there is excessive control and a sort of monopoly of power. In these circumstances, there again is not a level playing field, and decisions will always be made at the advantage of the group or person who dominates political control. As a result, ordinary citizen rights are lost and public resources are often plundered for the personal gain of the public officials. Poverty or scarcity of goods may also push people to live outside the law. Finally, corruption occurs when government officials resist government policies and programs. Introducing policies that allow for greater oversight would help to assure that power were balanced and no one person would be making all of the political decisions. When politicians resist this change they prevent political and cultural progress for their country, prohibit civic interests from being met, and allow the pattern of corruption to flourish. Dysfunctional Systems as a Cause for Corruption Instability in government may also catapult a nation and its leaders towards corruption. Among them, war, ethnic or religious conflict, economic hardship, and social inequalities may instigate corruption. Any circumstance that threatens a nation or its people either through identity or establishment may diminish the good governance practices of a nation. Even in less difficult times, the institutions and policies of government may undermine how well the government carries out its work. When institutions and policies are weak, individuals tend to take advantage of them. Therefore, poor governments are a product of sick institutions, or institutions that function poorly because of inadequate resources or bad  policies and procedures. As stated earlier, good governance refers to the provision of services that are responsive to citizen needs. When government services are not provided to citizens, either because they were deemed unnecessary, services providers demanded bribes or were lazy, or the services are provided in theory but are not readily available in practice without a bribe, people will aim to have their needs met illegally or unofficially. Likewise, when financial systems are outdated, they are more corruptible. System-Wide Allowances for Corrupt Behavior: Government may allow system wide corruption to spread by not institutionalizing and enforcing prevention mechanisms. For example: Overly complex procedures for obtaining public services allow government to covet the services to only the well-informed or well-connected elite, and not allowing the system to work for the poor. Lack of internal systems to assure relative transparency, monitoring and accountability in the design and execution of public policies. Lack of social control mechanisms aimed at preventing grand corruption schemes usually seen when the state’s policies are captured by vested interests. Lack of employee participation in and knowledge of the public institution’s decisionmaking criteria. Absence of results based management in public service delivery. An ineffective judicial sector (police, prosecutors, officers, and the judiciary.) Conclusion Problems in governance occur when a government is not only corrupt, but also when it is inefficient, unresponsive, or secretive. Essentially, when a government is ineffectual, it is considered to be corrupt. As this unit explained, corruption is fundamentally caused by low wages, poor incentive structures and inefficient systems. In addition, it is also caused by the desire for an unfair advantage, and the knowledge that one will not be caught or punished for corrupt behavior. Corruption is not just about ethics. It is also about how the government is set up and managed. Parliament and parliamentarians improve the way government works so that corrupt behavior is punishable and opportunities for corruption are limited through the laws. In order to fully rectify corruption in a society, it must first be thoroughly diagnosed. Unit three shows methods for diagnosing, measuring, and interpreting data on corruption. As the units thereafter will explain, this step will help to make focused and measurable changes and improvements to corruption when those mechanisms are enacted.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Andragogy and Self-Directed Learning - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 2 Words: 460 Downloads: 1 Date added: 2017/09/20 Category Education Essay Type Argumentative essay Tags: Discussion Essay Learning Essay Did you like this example? Andragogy and Self Directed Learning March 10, 2008 Adult Education and Learning: Principles and Practice Andragogy and Self-Directed Learning: Pillars of Adult Learning Theory Candys written statement (1991, p. 309) which reads â€Å"since a learners autonomy is likely to vary from situation to situation, educators should not assume that because a person has been self-directed in one situation, he or she will be able to succeed in a new area: Orientation, support and guidance may all be required in the first stages of a learning project†, was a highlight for me. As I read through this article it seems as though to much emphasis was being placed on who was right and who was wrong about their theory. In all actuality theories are evolutionary just as learners in adult education are; therefore, all of the theories were probably applicable during the time in which it was established, for the most part. Now Candy comes along and writes this statement in which I agree wi th, wholeheartedly. I do so, because I can think of instances were I prefer to be a self-directed learned, but thats only when I want to know something miscellaneous; however, primarily, by nature, I am a dependent learner with a concrete sequential learning style. I need explicit directions before feeling comfortable with going forth with a task. To me self-directed learning puts me in the mindset of on line courses, in which, I would never subject myself to, unless it was absolutely necessary. I need the teacher directed, concrete experience of being in a classroom and learning from discussion, feedback and interpretation, something that I just do not feel I would get from and on line course per se. Insight for me is the mere fact that the methodology behind teaching adult learners is so widely debated. I never actually took the time to think about how someone should educate me as an adult. However, now that I am an adult learner, I am extremely thankful that someone did take the time to develop theories on how adult learner should learn. And I am even more elated because they are all closely knit which gives me confidence in the fact that the general picture is effective. I feel challenged to keep up with the latest research on theories behind adult education to see if modern day theorist are relating their theories to the â€Å"fathers and grandfathers† of adult education. As I venture out into the world as an adult educator, I will incorporate different practices and theories and note which ones were most effective and for what type of learner. Bibliography Candy, P. C. Self-Direction for Lifelong Learning. San Fransico:Josey-Bass, 1991 Merriam, S. B. (2001) Andragogy and self-directed learning: pillars of adult learning theory. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 89,3-13. Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "Andragogy and Self-Directed Learning" essay for you Create order

Friday, December 27, 2019

Open Primary Definition and List of Open Primary States

A primary is the method political parties use in the U.S. to nominate candidates for elected office. The winners of the primaries in the two-party system become the party nominees, and they face each other in the election, which is held in November in even-numbered years.   But not all primaries are the same. There are open primaries and closed primaries, and several  kinds of primaries in between the two. Perhaps the most talked-about primary in modern history is the open primary, which advocates say encourages voter participation. More than a dozen states hold open primaries. An open primary is one in which voters can take part in either the Democratic or Republican nominating contests regardless of their party affiliation, as long as they are registered to vote. Voters registered with third-parties and independents are also allowed to take part in open primaries.   An open primary is the opposite of a closed primary, in which only registered members of that party can take part. In a closed primary, in other words, registered Republicans are allowed to vote only in the Republican primary, and registered Democrats are allowed to vote only in the Democratic primary. Voters registered with third-parties and independents are not permitted to take part in closed primaries. Support for Open Primaries Supporters of the open primary system argue that it encourages voter participation and leads to greater turnout at the polls. A growing segment of the U.S. population is not affiliated with either the Republican or Democratic parties, and is therefore blocked from taking part in closed presidential primaries. Supporters also argue that holding an open primary leads to the nomination of more centrist and less ideologically pure candidates who have broad appeal. Mischief in Open Primary States Allowing voters of any party to take part in either the Republican or Democratic presidential primary often invites mischief, commonly referred to as party-crashing. Party-crashing occurs when voters of one party support the most polarizing candidate in the other partys primary to bolster the chances that it will nominate someone unelectable to general election voters in November, according to the nonpartisan Center for Voting and Democracy in Maryland. In the 2012 Republican primaries, for example, Democratic activists launched a somewhat organized effort to prolong the GOP nomination process by voting for Rick Santorum, an underdog, in states that held open primaries. That effort, called Operation Hilarity, was organized by activist Markos Moulitsas Zuniga, the founder and publisher of , a popular blog among liberals and Democrats. The longer this GOP primary drags on, the better the numbers for Team Blue, Moulitsas wrote. In 2008, many Republicans voted for Hillary Clinton in the 2008 Democratic presidential primary because they felt she had less of a chance of defeating presumed Republican nominee John McCain, a U.S. senator from Arizona. 15 Open Primary States There are 15 states that allow voters to privately selected which primaries in which to participate. A registered Democrat, for example, could choose to cross party lines and vote for a Republican candidate. Critics argue that the open primary dilutes the parties’ ability to nominate. Supporters say this system gives voters maximal flexibility—allowing them to cross party lines—and maintains their privacy, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Those 15 states are:    AlabamaArkansasGeorgiaHawaiiMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontanaNorth DakotaSouth  CarolinaTexasVermontVirginiaWisconsin 9 Closed Primary States There are nine states that require primary voters to be registered with the party in whose primary they are participating. These closed-primary states also prohibit independent and third-party voters from voting in primaries and helping the parties choose their nominees. This system generally contributes to a strong party organization, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. These closed-primary states are:    DelawareFloridaKentuckyMarylandNevadaNew MexicoNew YorkOregonPennsylvania Other Types of Primaries There are other, more hybrid types of primaries that are neither fully open or completely closed. Heres a look at how those primaries work and the states that use these methods. Partially Closed Primaries: Some states leave it up to the parties themselves, which operate the primaries, to decide if independent and third-party voters can participate. These states include Alaska;  Connecticut;  Connecticut;  Idaho; North Carolina;  Oklahoma; South Dakota; and Utah. Nine other states allow independents to vote in party primaries:  Arizona; Colorado; Kansas; Maine; Massachusetts; New Hampshire; New Jersey; Rhode Island; and West Virginia.   Partially Open  Primaries: Voters in partially open primary states are allowed to choose which partys candidates they are nominating, but they must either publicly declare their selection or register with the party in whose primary they are participating. These states include: Illinois; Indiana; Iowa; Ohio; Tennessee; and Wyoming.

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Essay The Two-Second Judgment - 988 Words

We have been taught to stop and carefully consider all the options/factors involved before making an important decision. But in Blink, Malcolm Gladwell finds that in complex situations, our initial two-second judgments, our blink moments, are often more accurate than judgments derived from lengthy, painstaking analysis. Although Gladwell is careful to explore situations where two-second judgments fail, the most interesting scenarios are where rapid cognition succeeds. It contradicts reason to think that a two-second judgment could be more accurate than a carefully made analysis, but in many cases it is. In an attempt to persuade the readers mind about the importance of this blink moment, Gladwell tries to use the Greek philosopher†¦show more content†¦However, the reader learns, our brain sifts through the situation in front of us, throwing out all that is irrelevant and zeroes in on what really matters, and allows us to act on this through our â€Å"gut reaction.† Gladwell has some interesting evidence to back up his claim. In Blink, he begins with a story about an ancient Greek statute known as kouros that was offered to the Gerry Museum, LA. Relying on thorough scientific analysis, the curators of the museum believed the statue to be genuine and bought it for a huge sum of $ 10 million. But other art historians, upon first viewing the statue, instantly thought that it was fabricated. The former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art said his first reaction was fresh- as in, too fresh-looking to be so old. A Greek archaeologist saw the statue and immediately felt cold. According to Gladwell, those experts intuitions proved correct, and the initial scientific tests that authenticated the statue turned out to have been faulty. With the kouros forgery, Gladwell immediately tries to persuade the reader from the beginning of the book by launching his case for the surprising power of intuitive snap. As he puts it, there can be as much value in the blink of an eye as in months of rational analysis. Nevertheless, cases in which forgeries that intuitively appear legitimate but later are discovered through expert analysis to be frauds are fairly common in the art world. Numerous paintings of master forgerShow MoreRelatedBiblical Bible And The Bible1222 Words   |  5 Pagesfulfilled, but the prophecies regarding the second coming of Christ, and the end times are yet to be accomplished. A pre-tribulation futurist would also believe that the rapture of the Church will occur before the seven year span of time known as the â€Å"Tribulation†, the time appointed when God will judge mankind and the earth. This view would line up with a literal interpretation of Scripture as God promises to remove His children be fore the final judgment, and current events of the world would supportRead More The Judgment of Paris and The Miracle of the Fishes Artwork1605 Words   |  7 Pagesoften do we see things in life that require a double-take, a second glance, a follow-up look, or even multiple subsequent studies? The answer is quite simple: everyday. 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In other wordsRead MoreAnalysis Of The Book Revelation Relationship Between The Seals, Trumpets, And Bowls930 Words   |  4 Pagesthis article he lays out his thesis as ‘Each of these series of judgments [the Seals, Trumpets, and Bowls] is primarily sequential to the preceding one(s), but that the end of each series is parallel to the end of the other series (i.e., that the sixth and seventh seals, the seventh trumpet, and the seventh bowl are parallel to each other).† He deems t his view at the end of his article as a â€Å"Successive-Final† view. Davis is taking two views of Revelation, the sequential view, and the parallel viewRead MoreClinical Thinking and Critical Judgement Essay1100 Words   |  5 PagesQualitative Article Critique Critical thinking and clinical judgment are important skills that professional nurses use in every day clinical setting. In 2012, a mix method qualitative study by Dr. Jeanne Mann was done to evaluate the effectiveness of educational strategy to develop clinical judgment skills in nursing students. In this study, the population was identified as volunteered Level II baccalaureate nursing students from a Midwest nursing program. The variables identified in this articleRead MoreSnap Judgments: A Look into the Subconscious Mind Essay examples1451 Words   |  6 Pagesworks. Every second the brain processes four-hundred billion bits of information, while only two-thousand of those bits people become aware of. One can also observe that with so much information to process, there is a plethora of information in the world that can be obtained than what is actually being perceived. Unknowingly, people criticize others and make judgments without even being aware of their perception. Altho ugh it is said that one can acquire the skills to make judgments that are unbiasedRead MoreAdvantages And Disadvantages Of Illusory Causation1320 Words   |  6 Pagesa guilty verdict. The final judgment is not based on the content but how it influences a person’s own personal views and the form in which the brain analyzes the information presented (Lassiter, 2001). Lassiter’s research focuses on this phenomenon as he conducts three distinct research stages with each a different purpose. The purpose of this stage was to determine if there were biases involved; this was measured by using a scale to quantify the participants’ judgment based on the video recordingRead MoreUnderstanding The Signs Of The Times1266 Words   |  6 PagesUNDERSTANDING THE SIGNS OF THE TIMES The subject of the Second Coming of Christ (the End of the World) has been one that has attracted a great deal of interest throughout the years, but it is also one that has been greatly debated since its inception. This subject has almost become an obsession for many. There seems to be something intriguing about trying to predict the future. Many have used their views on this subject to guide their direction and gage their time in life; and in some casesRead MoreDescartes And The Fourth Meditation Essay1742 Words   |  7 Pagesresponsible for his judgment, and so his ability to judge must be sound; so long as he uses it correctly. Yet, If God has given Descartes indubitable judgment how is it Descartes makes an error from time to time? One possible answer is the fact that we can not see what God’s plans are, and so in the scheme of the entire universe our error could be making everything perfect. A second and more in-depth answer Descartes argues errors are mistaken judgments. When looking at what a judgment is composed ofRead MoreAssignment of Auditing1402 Words   |  6 PagesA professional judgment is a key factor in auditing. As a result of development of auditing and accounting industry, especially after a series of accounting fraud and auditing failure cases, such as Enron and Arthur Andersen, in the last decade, professional judgments is becoming a more and more important aspect for the independent auditing industry. Recently, many countries and professional bad issued more strict auditing standards to emphasize to this point. It means the auditor should be required